Moraes Remodel

Woodland Hills, CA

2,400 sq. ft. (before)

2,975 sq. ft. (after)

This couple loved the niches, warmth and nestled dwelling spaces of their ranch house, but also longed for some clean, modern lines and were HUGE on the view.

So we blew off the end of the house, added on a tiny amount and went up.

All the while giving them a master suite addition that was simultaneously traditional and modern; carved with alcoves and moments of respite, but also glassy out onto the world. An attenuated batten/board interior and exterior knitted the two worlds together. A world where a baroquely framed impressionistic painting finds new beauty along side the steel cable handrail.

This couple loved the niches, warmth and nestled dwelling spaces of their ranch house, but also longed for some clean, modern lines and were HUGE on the view.

So we blew off the end of the house, added on a tiny amount and went up.

All the while giving them a master suite addition that was simultaneously traditional and modern; carved with alcoves and moments of respite, but also glassy out onto the world. An attenuated batten/board interior and exterior knitted the two worlds together. A world where a baroquely framed impressionistic painting finds new beauty along side the steel cable handrail.

Young Residence

2,500 sq. ft. House

1,000 sq. ft. Covered Deck Area

3-Car Garage

This couple wanted a country farmhouse and all that that implies—the porch, the charm, the craft—but only one story please. Using the “Not So Big House” approach* we gave them a well crafted, unique and inspiring home.

By laying the house on the property in an “L” shaped, Wrightian-polliwog fashion, the house sculpts the backyard, provides an intensely private master suite and opens up the center of the house to simultaneous views of both the front and back yards.

At the interior, dramatically shaped ceilings, painted wood trim, niches and cubbies abound. A home that captures memories and imagination in its countless alveoli of space.

By using humble materials (fiber cement board siding, asphalt shingles, vinyl windows) and keeping the square footage under 2,500 sq. ft., we are able to splurge luxuriously in spots: a kitchen stone hearth over 27′-0″ tall, over 1,000 square feet of covered deck space, a vaulted oculus in the living room and a zen, stone master bathroom…how nice it is to do more with less.

*The Not So Big House is the first in a series of best-selling books by author Sarah Susanka

This couple wanted a country farmhouse and all that that implies—the porch, the charm, the craft—but only one story please. Using the “Not So Big House” approach* we gave them a well crafted, unique and inspiring home.

By laying the house on the property in an “L” shaped, Wrightian-polliwog fashion, the house sculpts the backyard, provides an intensely private master suite and opens up the center of the house to simultaneous views of both the front and back yards.

At the interior, dramatically shaped ceilings, painted wood trim, niches and cubbies abound. A home that captures memories and imagination in its countless alveoli of space.

By using humble materials (fiber cement board siding, asphalt shingles, vinyl windows) and keeping the square footage under 2,500 sq. ft., we are able to splurge luxuriously in spots: a kitchen stone hearth over 27′-0″ tall, over 1,000 square feet of covered deck space, a vaulted oculus in the living room and a zen, stone master bathroom…how nice it is to do more with less.

*The Not So Big House is the first in a series of best-selling books by author Sarah Susanka

Thousand Oaks Remodel

Thousand Oaks, CA

1,885 sq. ft. (before)

2,115 sq. ft. (after)

This couple loved the Arts and Crafts era—the wood, the hidden niches, the built-ins. Their 1950s ranch home had some of these elements but came with a too small dining room, a too wide kitchen, socially cut off from the rest of the house, and an overall dark, dank multi-colored-brick feel.

He wanted a hunting lodge, of course, and, while she appreciated the richness of stained wood, she needed more light and a touch of beauty.

We functionally solved their problems by adding 200 square feet to alter the layout. Aesthetically, we provided them with a vaulted, painted wood volume with skylights and stained moments. Built-ins were everywhere—the restaurant booth in the kitchen, the built-in benches in the living room that provide storage below and a wall of book cases that lined the living room. The Mackintosh elements of stained glass embedded throughout the woodwork are the cherry on the top. These blips of color brought the human touch, craft and warmth to the walls, columns, doors, cabinets and wherever they occurred.

A small addition that brought out the potential beauty the house had to offer.

This couple loved the Arts and Crafts era—the wood, the hidden niches, the built-ins. Their 1950s ranch home had some of these elements but came with a too small dining room, a too wide kitchen, socially cut off from the rest of the house, and an overall dark, dank multi-colored-brick feel.

He wanted a hunting lodge, of course, and, while she appreciated the richness of stained wood, she needed more light and a touch of beauty.

We functionally solved their problems by adding 200 square feet to alter the layout. Aesthetically, we provided them with a vaulted, painted wood volume with skylights and stained moments. Built-ins were everywhere—the restaurant booth in the kitchen, the built-in benches in the living room that provide storage below and a wall of book cases that lined the living room. The Mackintosh elements of stained glass embedded throughout the woodwork are the cherry on the top. These blips of color brought the human touch, craft and warmth to the walls, columns, doors, cabinets and wherever they occurred.

A small addition that brought out the potential beauty the house had to offer.

Thousand Oaks Bathroom Remodel

This bathroom remodel was a second phase to the Thousand Oaks Remodel. The couple wanted to continue to weave in the Arts and Crafts/Macintosh detailing, but in more of a spa/get-away feel.

We provided them cleaner lines and a warm, soothing, luxurious palette. Walnut wood and Portobeige limestone provided the rich, neutral base with accents of blue-green glass. A touch of iridescence in the glass mosaic and chrome brought the neutral palette just the right amount of shimmer and pizzazz.

We have to give enormous accolades to one of our favorite contractors—Dave Warner of DW Designs 805.338.0880—for doing such an amazing job on all of the stone and tile work!

This bathroom remodel was a second phase to the Thousand Oaks Remodel. The couple wanted to continue to weave in the Arts and Crafts/Macintosh detailing, but in more of a spa/get-away feel.

We provided them cleaner lines and a warm, soothing, luxurious palette. Walnut wood and Portobeige limestone provided the rich, neutral base with accents of blue-green glass. A touch of iridescence in the glass mosaic and chrome brought the neutral palette just the right amount of shimmer and pizzazz.

We have to give enormous accolades to one of our favorite contractors—Dave Warner of DW Designs 805.338.0880—for doing such an amazing job on all of the stone and tile work!

Silver Goldstein Cabinets

Two lifetimes of prized possessions were coming together when this couple married later in life—from neon sculptures to Hebrew and African artifacts. They wanted something modern and very cool, but also very warm.

The cabinets became a dialogue between negative and positive space. Lighter douglas fir cabinets formed the solids out of the darker, mahogany, wood voids. We punched color into two of the niches for fun, while pulling some of the volumes forward into relief.

Two lifetimes of prized possessions were coming together when this couple married later in life—from neon sculptures to Hebrew and African artifacts. They wanted something modern and very cool, but also very warm.

The cabinets became a dialogue between negative and positive space. Lighter douglas fir cabinets formed the solids out of the darker, mahogany, wood voids. We punched color into two of the niches for fun, while pulling some of the volumes forward into relief.